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How the Troubles came to Northern Ireland by Rose, Peter

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Published by Palgrave in association with [the] Institute of Contemporary British History in Houndmills, Basingstoke [England], New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Ulster (Northern Ireland and Ireland),
  • Ireland,
  • Great Britain,
  • Northern Ireland

Subjects:

  • Wilson, Harold, Sir, 1916-,
  • Political violence -- Northern Ireland -- History -- 20th century.,
  • Ulster (Northern Ireland and Ireland) -- History.,
  • Ireland -- Foreign relations -- Great Britain.,
  • Great Britain -- Foreign relations -- Ireland.,
  • Northern Ireland -- History.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 204-208) and index.

StatementPeter Rose.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDA990.U46 R637 2000
The Physical Object
Paginationxviii, 216 p. ;
Number of Pages216
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL38102M
ISBN 100312224346, 0333753461
LC Control Number99025772

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The Troubles, also called Northern Ireland conflict, violent sectarian conflict from about to in Northern Ireland between the overwhelmingly Protestant unionists (loyalists), who desired the province to remain part of the United Kingdom, and the overwhelmingly Roman Catholic nationalists (republicans), who wanted Northern Ireland to become part of the republic of Ireland. The phase of the complex social and political Northern Ireland conflict often referred to as the Troubles began in and lasted until the s, claiming over 3, lives and bitterly dividing. Alan MacLeod, author of International Politics and the Northern Ireland Conflict: The USA, Diplomacy and the Troubles, seeks to explore and analyse the various diplomatic machinations of four. Terrorism, Torture and 3, Lives Lost: Revisiting ‘the Troubles’ in Northern Ireland Patrick Radden Keefe’s new book Say Nothing investigates the mystery of a missing mother and reveals a.

In a new book about Northern Ireland historian Peter Rose argues that if Harold Wilson's government in the late sixties had pursued a different policy the province might have been spared The Troubles. The best books on The Troubles recommended by Timothy Knatchbull In August , Timothy Knatchbull and his family went out in a boat off the coast of Ireland. Neither his grandparents or his twin brother would return from the IRA bomb attack that shocked Britain and the world.   In a new book about Northern Ireland historian Peter Rose argues that if Harold Wilson's government in the late sixties had pursued a different policy the province might have been spared The Troubles. Wilson had promised the Catholics that they would be granted their civil rights. However, new evidence suggests that Westminster was deliberately gagged to prevent MPs demanding that the . In How the Troubles Came to Northern Ireland Peter Rose argues that if Harold Wilson's government in the late sixties had pursued a different policy the province might have been spared The Troubles. Wilson had promised the Catholics that they would be granted their civil : Peter Rose.